Complete guide to the top 24 coding bootcamps

Do you want to get into the programming field even though you aren't a programmer? Do you just want to get your feet wet to improve your collaboration with software developers or move into a support role? Or do you want to build a prototype for your potential startup? Any of these is a good decision for your career. Software is a great field.

  • The U.S. median pay for programmers is $79,530 a year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The top 10 percent make more than $130,800.
     
  • With additional education or on-the-job experience, you can move beyond writing and testing code into software development, the creative part of writing applications. The U.S. median pay for software developers is $100,690 a year and more than $153,710 for the top 10 percent.
     
  • You might eventually get into information system management (median pay is $131,600).

Usually, the first step toward entering the software field is to roll up your sleeves and learn to code. Not so long ago, that typically meant getting a four-year degree at a college and then finding out that the theory you learned didn't necessarily prepare you for how software is actually written in the real world. Or taking certification tests without getting any real experience. Now there are other options.

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Coding bootcamps say they can take you from coding zero to coding hero in a compressed amount of time, focusing on languages, tools, and techniques that companies actually use in their work.

We've gone through lists of hundreds of bootcamps, picked out the 24 best known and most recommended, and then grilled them for granular information about their programs so we can help you choose the best fit for your needs. The bootcamps have a variety of topic tracks, time commitments, and both in-person and online formats.

Before we dig into the data we gathered, take a look at some of the things you should consider before deciding whether or not to enroll in a bootcamp.

Before you commit to a bootcamp

  • Try programming before you invest the time and money in a bootcamp (maybe you'll find out that coding is not for you, and that's okay). There are many free online courses, including Codecademy, Code School, the Introduction to Computer Science and Programming course at MIT's online OpenCourseware, Harvard's introductory computer science course on edX, and numerous choices on Coursera. If you're going to make a career out of programming, you have to really enjoy it.
     
  • Realize that you're not going to make big money right from the start; that takes years of career development. Even the median salary for a programmer may be more than you'd get initially, because you'll be starting without professional experience or a degree from a major university.
     
  • Getting into programming through a bootcamp requires significant effort for an extended period of time. It's more like the beginning of a lifestyle change than a one-time thing, if you're planning to become a developer. Going in without the resolve to see it through would likely be a waste of time and money.
     
  • Be prepared to work hard in your job search after the bootcamp, and continue to code at the pace you were working when you were still in your bootcamp. The market is flooded with bootcamp graduates right now. Try to differentiate yourself once you finish your bootcamp, and always be coding.
     
  • Three months of 20 to 30 hours a week learning coding is still not enough to go from complete beginner to professional developer. For some of the more immersive programs, 20 to 30 hours just covers the week's classes. In bootcamps such as those you'll likely spend 80 to 100 hours a week. It might be enough to get your foot in the door at a company or start working on projects for 6 to 12 more months before you really start to hit your stride as a junior developer.
     
  • Avoid companies that haven't been doing bootcamps for at least two years. Most of the horror stories come from bootcamps that were in their minimum viable product (MVP) phase and constantly making mistakes with how the programs were run.
     
  • If a program hires many or all of its TAs/mentors/instructors directly out of its own program, ask if these TAs are included in the percentage of full-time hires out of the program that they provide. TA hiring or random freelance jobs from the program can be provided to graduates as a way to pad their job placement stats.
     
  • If you're considering moving to a major city for a bootcamp, be sure to check out the Stack Overflow survey's big-mac index and rent costs vs. developer salaries for the areas you are considering.

The data we collected

We emailed scores of bootcamp companies and asked each one 19 questions about their programs:

  1. What courses are offered? "Full stack," used by some of the companies to describe their offerings, means a course that covers both front end (the part the user sees) and back end (the portion running on servers).
     
  2. Is the program in person only, online only, or a combination?
     
  3. Where are your U.S. locations?
     
  4. What percentage of students who complete the program are in full-time jobs doing actual programming within six months? Categories such as "contractors" and "freelancers" can mask students actually being out of work.
     
  5. What is their median starting salary?
     
  6. What is the teacher-to-student ratio for any given class?
     
  7. How much time is devoted to one-to-one interactions between students and teachers?
     
  8. What percentage of the teachers have previously worked as professional programmers full time?
     
  9. How much instruction is handled by teachers' assistants (TAs)? What is the necessary experience for TAs?
     
  10. What percentage of instructors/mentors and TAs were hired directly after participating in the program themselves, versus working as programmers first?
     
  11. What languages, systems, and tools, including operating systems and hardware, do students learn?
     
  12. What is the course syllabus? (Links are provided below when offered by the companies profiled.) What are the stages of exercises and/or actual application writing? What applications are students required to build?
     
  13. What background is required for the program?
     
  14. Are students put together to do pair programming, a technique used in agile programming so that experienced developers can check one another's work? (Note: Some argue that new students may not be ready to effectively use pair programming and that the practice could result in stronger students doing more of the work or students who know little trying to teach each other.)
     
  15. How many hours a week does the student need to commit to coursework and class time on average?
     
  16. How long does the program run?
     
  17. How long has this organization publicly offered code bootcamps/courses?
     
  18. How much does the program cost, and when must the fees be paid? Does that include living expenses?
     
  19. What percentage of students completes the program on time?

The answers collected from these emails have been combined to make an excellent resource for anyone exploring which bootcamps to enroll in. However, make sure you perform your own due diligence and contact the programs directly. You may find that if two providers seem equivalent in terms of raw information, one may ultimately be a better fit once you have a chance to talk with a representative. A good bootcamp should seek to set up a call with you if you apply to enroll.

Here is the data for each bootcamp that responded, in alphabetical order:

Anyone Can Learn to Code

Anyone Can Learn to Code focuses on a core of Ruby on Rails-focused web development, with lessons around Test-Driven Development, API building, front-end JavaScript (and the front-end JavaScript framework, AngularJS), and database management for web apps. The distinguishing features are night and weekend class time (it's part time, so you don't have to quit your job), and the 6-to-17-week apprenticeship, which could help you ramp up to a job. Almost all of the TAs come directly from the program.

  • Courses: Full-stack web development
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person on weeknights and Sundays
  • Locations: Chicago, New York, and San Francisco
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 90 percent
  • Median starting salary: No number provided. "Salaries are on par with entry-level web development positions in their respective locations."
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:5
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: "Instructors are available to meet with students one-on-one anytime a student wishes."
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? Must be "capable programmers as well as good educators."
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: "Almost all" TAs went through the program. One lead instructor went through the program, going on to a full-time web development position before coming back to teach.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Ruby on Rails, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and AngularJS, plus database design, SQL, Test-Driven Development, and creating and consuming APIs
  • Course syllabus: Not provided. Students go through a 3-week preparatory phase, 12 weeks in class, and then an apprenticeship that lasts anywhere from 6 to 17 weeks, at the choice of the student.
  • Required student background: None
  • Student-student pair programming? Minimum during classes. More experience at pair programming in the apprenticeship.
  • Hours per week: 22 hours per week, not counting personal practice time, during classes. Apprenticeship takes 20 hours per week.
  • Length of program: 15 weeks and then 6-to-17-week apprenticeship.
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2014
  • Costs: $12,500, including a $1,000 deposit, half of the remainder due on the first day, the remaining part at the halfway point in the classes.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 90 percent

App Academy

App Academy is heavy on hours and pair programming. With a compressed time frame of 12 weeks, students spend 90 hours a week coding—your days will literally be eat, sleep, code. But App Academy is so sure that you'll land a career in programming that you pay nothing until you start getting a salary in a programming-related job. Then it shaves 18 percent off your first year's salary. You'll learn two popular ways to build a web app: Ruby on Rails and React + Flux. You'll also get training for those algorithm-heavy developer interviews.

  • Courses: Ruby and JavaScript development
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person
  • Locations: San Francisco and New York City
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 98 percent within 12 months. No 6-month figure given.
  • Median starting salary: Gave average, not median, starting salaries of $105,000 in San Francisco and $89,000 in New York City. Both cities have high costs of living, and average salaries can be weighted by a relatively small percentage of high earners.
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:8
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Instructors are available for questions during classes. Students can schedule time before or after classes.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 90 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? Over time, TAs teach several short lectures per group.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: Almost 100 percent of TAs, all in the top 5 percent of their groups. About 90 percent of all TAs and instructors went through App Academy "at one point in their careers," which currently would mean within the last four years.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned? Ruby, Rails, SQL, JavaScript, React, Flux, and algorithms
  • Course syllabus: Available online
  • Required student background: No formal requirements other than being "passionate about web development."
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes, with partners changing daily
  • Hours per week: 90
  • Length of program: 12 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2012
  • Costs: Pay 18 percent of first year's salary. Fees paid over a six-month period after finding a full-time job, which means paying roughly a third of salary during those six months.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 95 percent complete the program, although time frame was not provided.

Big Nerd Ranch

Big Nerd Ranch is not a total beginner-to-professional-developer bootcamp.  It's a one week bootcamp aimed mostly at people who are already engineers and want to add native mobile development to their skill set. Even though there are only two locations, the one-week time frame makes attending convenient even for students who don't live nearby, since they only need to travel to the destination city (there's one on each coast) for a week. The cost also includes living expenses. You might even be able to get your company to pay for it. The camp is challenging even for experienced engineers, but it has a 100 percent completion rate.

  • Courses: Various courses for Android, iOS, and web development
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person
  • Locations: Atlanta, Georgia; Monterey County, California
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: Does not track this data.
  • Median starting salary: Does not track this data. Most students are already engineers.
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: From 1:5 to a maximum of 1:22
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Instructors have lab hours for 4 hours a day. A student can try to get some 1 on 1 time in that timeframe.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: All teachers work on client-facing development projects.
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? 0 percent
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 0 percent
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Swift, Objective-C, OpenGL, Android/Java, Cocoa, Sketch, Python, Ruby
  • Course syllabus: Available online
  • Required student background: Basic programming skills
  • Student-student pair programming? No
  • Hours per week: 50 to 70 
  • Length of program: Five to seven days
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Over 15 years
  • Costs: Depending on the course, between $3,500 and $6,000, including living expenses
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 100 percent

Bloc

Bloc is an online-only bootcamp school with several courses, including design, UX, Rails web development (for both the Rails course and the software engineering track), JavaScript front-end development, and native mobile development in both Android and iOS. Bloc uses a mentor system, where students meet with their mentor a few times a week via screen sharing and work through problems. The rest of the course involves the student completing lessons and self-guided projects. There are very granular options for hours-per-week commitments and program lengths.

  • Courses: Software engineering track, part-time web developer track, designer trackRails web development course, front-end web development courseUX/UI design courseiOS development courseAndroid development course
  • In person, online, or a combination? Online
  • Locations: Online
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: Not published yet
  • Median starting salary: Not published yet
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: All programs have a 1:1 student to mentor ratio
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Approximately two or three 30-to-60-minute meetings per week depending on need and availability
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? No TAs, only mentors/instructors
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: Some are hired very nearly out of the program after a few freelance projects.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Ruby, Rails, iOS, Android, JavaScript, jQuery, AngularJS, and more. Visit course links above for curriculums of each course.
  • Course syllabus: See links under the Courses section above. Software engineering track consists of programming fundamentals, exercises in Ruby, building a CSV crawling command line app, building a Reddit clone, then choosing from several capstone project suggestions (or your own idea) for your final applications.
  • Required student background: No background in programming is required, but pre-work is strictly enforced.
  • Student-student pair programming? No, unless initiated by students on various forums. Mentor-student pair programming occurs.
  • Length of programs and hours per week: Part-time web developer track: For the 27-week pace, 20-plus hours per week is required. For the 54-week pace, 12-plus hours per week is required.
    Software engineering track: For the 48-week pace, 40-plus hours per week are required. For the 72-week pace, 25-plus hours per week are required. For the 144-week pace, 15-plus hours per week are required. The designer track has some differences.
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2012
  • Costs: Part-time web developer track: $8,800. Software engineering track: $24,000. Designer track: $9,800. Courses: $4,999.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: There is no fixed graduation date. Students are free to pause and restart several times, and most do for holidays, vacations, etc.

Code Fellows

Code Fellows has a very flexible array of courses, from a one-day, $99 intro to coding course to ten-week, full-time courses. There are part-time (nights and weekends) versions of each course that last twice as long as the full-time versions. It teaches full-stack JavaScript (Node.js), Python (Django, Flask, Pyramid), and iOS. No Ruby on Rails. To go from beginner to professional through these courses is expensive, since the prior course (or equivalent knowledge) is required for each successive course. Very limited area in the US Northwest.

  • Courses: Code 101 (Intro to Software Development & Careers in Tech), Code 201 (Foundations of Software Development, to prepare for an internship), Code 301 (Intermediate Software Development, prepare to be an entry-level website builder), and Code 401 (Advanced Software Development, advanced training in a specific programming language)

    code fellows course chart
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person. There are versions for day students and for nights and weekends.
  • Locations: Portland, Oregon; Seattle, Washington
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 97 percent
  • Median starting salary: $71,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: Average is 1:5 or 1:7, but no greater than 1:10.
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Instructors are generally available for three or more hours daily for individual coaching.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: No percentage provided. Instructors are required to have experience either in professional software development or as a teacher or instructor, including experience teaching people to code.
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? TAs' primary role is to aid in grading and helping to answer student questions.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: No percentage offered, although Code Fellows said that it uses a "near-peer" model in which TAs have gone through the program but have not attained significant professional development experience.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Teaches a "variety of programming languages," including HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Python, and iOS (the latter is an operating system, not programming language, but has its own development requirements and its languages are Objective-C and Swift).
  • Course syllabus: Available online. In Code 201, students build three interactive websites. In Code 301, students architect a client-side web application, using the model-view-controller design pattern. They also build a portfolio page that highlights projects they've worked on and apps they’ve built. During each of the ten-week Code 401 classes (JavaScript, iOS, and Python), students create full-stack apps that persist data, and they present interactive interfaces according to best practices of their stack.
  • Required student background: Code 201 requires preparatory online coursework. Applicants to Code 301 must have a solid foundation in development and be very comfortable with all of the topics covered in Code 201. Applicants to Code 401 must have a solid foundation in web development and must have completed Code 201 and Code 301 or have equivalent education and/or experience.
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes
  • Hours per week: For daytime courses, students frequently spend 50 to 60 hours. For night and weekend courses, there are 20 hours allotted, but students may need more time.
  • Length of program: Daytime programs run from 4 to 18 weeks. Night and weekend courses run from 8 to 36 weeks.
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since March 2013
  • Costs: Code 201 is $3,500, Code 301 is $4,500, and Code 401 is $12,000. Half of the cost must be paid before the first day and the second half by midway through the course.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 88 percent

Bullet four of this section had an error in an earlier version of this article stating Code Fellows had a completion rate of 79 percent.  It has since been corrected to 97 percent.

Coder Camps

Coder Camps has a wide range of locations except on the East Coast. It has the usual suspects in Ruby on Rails and full-stack JavaScript/Node.js, but it also has some enterprise languages with Java and .NET. They may not be sexy, but the job prospects are much higher for those languages. It's surprising that more bootcamps don't offer Java or .NET. The program is 12 weeks if paired with Coding from Scratch for the first three weeks, but students also have the option of doing a self-paced course that can go for six months. All TAs are hired directly out of the program.

  • Courses: Full-stack Java, full-stack Ruby on Rails, full-stack JavaScript, and full-stack .NET
  • In person, online, or a combination? In-person immersive, online immersive, and self-paced options
  • Locations: Currently in Houston, San Francisco, Seattle, and Chicago. Plans to open in San Antonio, Austin, Dallas, Tulsa, Oklahoma City, and Phoenix.
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: Over 90 percent work either in full-time jobs or as contractors, but no information as to what percentage of those are in full-time positions versus being contractors. (Matriculated students hired as TAs don't count as having been hired. The clock starts after they leave the organization.)
  • Median starting salary: About $70,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:7
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Students can schedule sessions whenever needed. Weekly review sessions of 30 minutes to an hour let students get additional help.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? Main instructor is in the classroom all day. Company did not directly answer how much of instruction is left to TAs. It did say that TAs take turns staying late to help students.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 100 percent of TAs, no instructors
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Java on Windows or Mac, Ruby on Rails on Mac, JavaScript on Windows or Mac, .NET on Windows 10
  • Course syllabus: Did not provide a syllabus but said each lesson has full videos to explain the lesson, the activity, and solution, and there are written code examples and explanations of material topics. Projects depend on whether Coder Camps Atlas has partners that want students to work on projects. Often students want to work on their own ideas. Each student must complete an individual project and contribute to a team project.
  • Required student background: Some coding background required, or you must complete the Coding from Scratch course.
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes, as well as individual work
  • Hours per week: 60 to 80 a week
  • Length of program: Immersive courses are nine weeks. Coding from Scratch is self-paced and takes about three weeks, at 20 hours a week. Self-paced full-stack programs can be completed over six months.
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since early 2013
  • Costs: $11,900, which must be paid or have financing arranged before taking Coding from Scratch.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 95 percent. Those that don't complete on time can pick up where they left off at no additional cost.

Coder Foundry

Coder Foundry is a full-time, 18-week course for beginners and a 12-week course for current professionals. It teaches .NET (C#) back end and JavaScript front end. The course structure and time allotments are very flexible, giving students a lot of freedom to chart their own course. Very limited area in the mid-Atlantic region.

  • Courses: Intro to Web Programming and immersive full-stack development
  • In person, online, or a combination? Intro to Web Programming is online. Full-stack development is in person.
  • Locations: Charlotte and Kernersville, North Carolina
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: Did not answer.
  • Median starting salary: Did not answer.
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:7
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Lectures last only 40 minutes. Instructors are then available for personal interaction while students spend 95 percent of their time coding.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: Three instructors. One taught computer science at universities for ten years. The other two have been professional developers.
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? No TAs
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: Not applicable. Two instructors did take the course to update their skills but had already been professional developers.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: C#, .NET, SQL, JavaScript, HTML, CSS, Visual Studio, Git, web APIs, Bootstrap, and MVC
  • Course syllabus: Coder Foundry students build four applications, including a website, a blog, a car finder, and a bug tracker. Students create both the front­ and back end of each project.
  • Required student background: Students take an online prerequisite course on web programming fundamentals before being able to enroll in the onsite course. No requirements for the online course.
  • Student-student pair programming? Students help each other solve problems but do no pair programming.
  • Hours per week: No average number given.
  • Length of program: 18 weeks, with an accelerated version for professional developers that lasts 12 weeks.
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2014
  • Costs: Immersive course is $13,900, with accelerated version costing $9,900.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 80 percent

Codesmith

Codesmith is a TA-heavy, full-stack JavaScript program that recruits TAs from among former students. It teaches nonrelational databases (MongoDB) as well as relational (Postgres). A fairly young program, it follows the standard model of 60 to 80 hours a week for 12 weeks, full time. The single location is in the Los Angeles area.

  • Courses: Full-stack web development
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person
  • Location: Playa Vista, California
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: Not provided
  • Median starting salary: Not provided
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:3
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Company claimed that program uses "Oxford University paradigm of independent study," which typically means close work with teachers for limited times and then independent work.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? "Most" instruction is provided by senior teachers. TAs "assist in coding challenges, lessons, and late nights."
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: All TAs come from a group of graduates. The positions last 12 weeks, and then the TAs leave to work at other companies.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: JavaScript, React, Node, AngularJS, HTTP, SSL, RESTful API development, relational and nonrelational databases (MongoDB, PostgreSQL), and authentication and authorization (Express, Passport.js, and OAuth)
  • Course syllabus: Curriculum covers computer science (including data structures, algorithms, big O analysis, and object-oriented and functional programming), core programming concepts, and full-stack web development. Students take a pre-course before the program starts and then spend four weeks on lectures and challenges. Project building and advanced lectures run from weeks 5 through 12, with additional models on subjects like mobile development, security, and distributed systems in weeks 6 through 10.
  • Required student background: Candidates take 100 hours of free classes on JavaScript before interviewing for the program.
  • Student-student pair programming? More than 300 hours out of the total 1,000-hour program are spent in pair programming.
  • Hours per week: 60 to 90 
  • Length of program: 12 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since June 2015
  • Costs: $17,200, including a $2,200 deposit. All fees paid before class starts.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 90 percent

Dev Bootcamp

Dev Bootcamp is a Ruby web development program focused on Rails and Sinatra frameworks. Includes a nine-week online prep phase that is 20 hours a week. Then it includes ten more weeks of in-person classes and coding, which is 40 to 60 hours a week.

  • Courses: Full-stack web development
  • In person, online, or a combination? A combination, with nine weeks completely online and nine weeks in person.
  • Locations: San Francisco, New York, Chicago, San Diego, Seattle, and Austin. Other locations are planned later this year and in 2017.
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: Does not provide information because methodologies can be created to artificially inflate results.
  • Median starting salary: Does not provide information because methodologies can be created to artificially inflate results.
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:3 or 1:5
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: As much time as necessary before the class day starts, during lunch, after hours, and on weekends.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: Company hires "experienced technical practitioners," but it did not state what percentage of teachers had previously worked full time as programmers.
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? No answer
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: No answer
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: HTML, CSS, Ruby, JavaScript, PostgreSQL, ActiveRecord, Sinatra, Rack, Rails, AJAX, and jQuery
  • Course syllabus: A syllabus is available to people who attend info sessions or who email the admission team.
  • Required student background: No prerequisites
  • Student-student pair programming? Students tackle projects in pairs and larger groups to mimic real-world workplace environments. Pairs change with every project.
  • Hours per week: For the nine-week online prep phase, 20 hours. For the in-person portion, 40 to 60 hours.
  • Length of program: 19 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2012
  • Costs: Depends on the city: $13,950 in San Francisco and New York City, $12,700 in other cities, all including $1,000 deposit.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: "Most" finish on time. Depending on assessments, a student may be asked to repeat a three-week, in-person session for up to two times at no additional cost.

DevLeague

DevLeague is a full-stack JavaScript course that includes Express.js and Meteor for the back end and AngularJS and React for the front end. Postgres and MongoDB are the database choices. You'll be in scenic Honolulu, but you won't spend much time lounging on the beach for any of the 12 weeks of the course, because there's a 66-hour-per-week minimum.

  • Courses: Full-stack JavaScript development
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person, both full and part time
  • Location: Honolulu
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 80 percent, with another 10 percent working "contract and freelance by choice"
  • Median starting salary: $49,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:6
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Instructors and TAs are in class at all times, and students can request one-on-one help at any time.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? Instruction is by instructors. TAs are available to provide help. All TAs are software developers and work at DevLeague in their off hours.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 1.6 percent of instructors and 3.3 percent of TAs were hired by DevLeague after graduation, but they also have day jobs elsewhere.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: OS X, Linux, JavaScript, HTML5, CSS3, Git, Bash, zShell, Gulp, Webpack, Mocha, Chai, Tape, Node.js, Express.js, jQuery, SASS, Foundation, LoDash, PostgreSQL, Sequelize, MongoDB, Mongoose, AngularJS, Meteor, React, D3, OAuth, Passport, HTTP/HTTPS, SSH, and VPS
  • Course syllabus: Available online
  • Required student background: None, although students "must complete rigorous coding challenges to gain acceptance to the program."
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes
  • Hours per week: Mandatory minimum of 66 hours a week
  • Length of program: Not provided, but the site says 12 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since January 2014
  • Costs: $10,500
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 100 percent

Flatiron School

Flatiron School is an online and in-person bootcamp for the web development track. iOS is in person only. The web development track focuses on Ruby on Rails. The in-person program is three months, with no expected weekly hours listed. The online course is self-paced, for up to six months. Frequently hires TAs/junior instructors directly from program graduates.

  • Courses: Web development, iOS development, and HTML and CSS
  • In person, online, or a combination? Web development and iOS development are in person. Web development also available online only, as is HTML and CSS.
  • Locations: New York City
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 95 percent
  • Median starting salary: $74,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: Not answered
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Students "almost always have immediate access to faculty."
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: All lead instructors have at least two years of full-time professional experience.
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? "Almost all" lectures are done by lead instructors. Junior instructors, which seem to be the equivalent of TAs, conduct mini breakout sessions or review labs.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: TAs/junior instructors are "mostly alumni."
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned? Ruby, SQL, Ruby on Rails, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. iOS ecosystem including Objective-C and Swift.
  • Course syllabus: Available for download (click "Curriculum")
  • Required student background: None
  • Student-student pair programming? Students are encouraged to work in study groups. No direct answer on whether pair programming is used.
  • Hours per week: No number provided.
  • Length of program: Immersive program is three months. Online program is self-paced.
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2012
  • Costs: Immersive programs are $15,000. Self-paced online programs are $1,500 a month, with costs capped at $12,000.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: Not answered

General Assembly

General Assembly has a much wider array of courses than most coding bootcamps, including design/UX topics and data science along with a variety of mobile and web development tracks. It's also very widespread, with schools in every major US time zone. The web development course focuses on both Rails and full-stack JavaScript, with front-end JavaScript frameworks and Express.js plus Node.js. Course lengths are variable among the courses, but they still stay within a 10-to-13-week window, with an average of about 80 hours a week. The web development course is available online.

  • Courses: Full time: Web Development Immersive, Data Science Immersive, User Experience Design Immersive, and Android Development Immersive. Part time: User Experience Design, Data Science, Product Management, Visual Design, Digital Marketing, JavaScript Development, Front-end Web Development, and Data Analytics.
  • In person, online, or a combination? All classes available in person. Web Development Immersive also available online only.
  • Locations: Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C.
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 99 percent
  • Median starting salary: Varies by market, but no numbers specifically provided.
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: From 1:6 to 1:8
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: "A lot," but no numbers provided. "Instructional teams … are available to answer questions inside and outside of class."
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: "Our full-stack instructors have previously worked as professional programmers, our UX instructors have previously worked in roles like lead UX designers and agency roles, our data science instructors have previously worked in roles where they leveraged their data science expertise (i.e. business analytics, data scientist, etc.) and our Android development instructors were previously Android developers."
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? Not provided
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: "A number," but no percentage provided
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned? Varies by course. For Web Development Intensive: HTML, CSS, Ruby on Rails, SQL, JavaScript, one front-end framework (AngularJS, Backbone.js, ReactJS, Meteor.js), Express.js, Node.js, Unix command line, Heroku, Git/Github, and Sublime or Atom. For Android Development Immersive: Java, XML, SQL, Android Studio, and Material Design.
  • Course syllabus: Available online (click on the type of course and then a specific course title). For Web Development Immersive: Build a game that uses an HTML and SASS responsive layout and JQuery logic; build and deploy a standard, secured CRUD app; with a team, build a jQuery front end that consumes a custom API with Express and MongoDB; and focus on a specific skill you want to learn (JavaScript MV* frameworks, advanced JavaScript, computer science, or independent learning). For Android Development Intensive: Build your first, simple Android app that allows users to view, create, and edit a list of items; build a neighborhood tourism app that allows users to search for locations, look through location descriptions pages, and save favorites; work in a group to create a news-reader app based on a design brief from one of our partner companies, which include VICE, CNN, and TouchLab; and build your own Google Play-ready app as your capstone project.
  • Required student background: No background necessary
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes, and group projects throughout
  • Hours per week: 80 
  • Length of program: 10 to 13 weeks, depending on the program
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2012
  • Costs: Web Development Immersive or Android Development Immersive costs $13,500. Other course prices on the website.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: Company said it doesn't measure but estimated that a "vast majority" complete the immersive programs. It gives extensions only on a case-by-case basis.

Hackbright Academy

Hackbright Academy is a software engineering school for women. The program teaches Flask-based Python web development along with general programming skills.  The 10-day foundational prep course for the bootcamp is free and remote. Both full and part-time courses run for 12 weeks. 

  • Courses: Full-time Engineering Fellowship and part-time Intro to Programming
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person, but there's an online 10-day crash course
  • Location: San Francisco
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 84 percent of Engineering Fellowship graduates get their first job offer within three months.
  • Median starting salary: Average starting salary for full-time positions is $89,000.
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:4
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: "Multiple hours"
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? TAs support students with questions and code reviews.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: "Varies." Must be in the top third of graduates.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Python, Flask, JavaScript, HTML, CSS, SQL/ORMs, Git, data structures, and algorithms
  • Course syllabus: Available online
  • Required student background: 20 hours of coding practice, available through the online crash course
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes
  • Hours per week: 63 
  • Length of program: 12 weeks for both full- and part-time courses
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2012
  • Costs: $16,570, paid before the program starts
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 100 percent, "with the exception of any health issues/family emergencies."

Hack Reactor

Hack Reactor has stricter application requirements than many other bootcamps, and it's one of the most expensive, but it also has the highest median starting salary. Those are the reasons it has a strong reputation in the Bay Area as "the Harvard of coding bootcamps." It stresses that it is "not a 0-60 program, but a 20-120 program," but if you've taken some Code School or Codecademy courses on JavaScript, you can probably pass the application process. It teaches full-stack JavaScript development.

  • Courses: Full-stack JavaScript development
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person, but there's currently a Hack Reactor Remote Beta that is all online.
  • Locations: San Francisco
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: As of 2015, 98 percent of students receive a full-time job offer for software engineering work, according to Hack Reactor's Standard Student Outcomes Methodology (SSOM).
  • Median starting salary: $104,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: None given. Mixture of lectures (20 percent of students' time), student groups, regular check-ins with course counselors, and individual assistance from technical mentors upon request. 
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Regular counselor check-ins and technical mentors available throughout the day
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: The instructors are called "Technical Mentors". At times, students have said it was 100%, but it varies because there is frequent turnover. Right after my TA time ended there were 0Technical Mentors with full time programming experience for the remote program.
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? They call TA's "Hacker in Residence", they are made up exclusively of exiting students, it's a 12 week contract. They are different from the technical mentors. They generally take the best students from the most recent cohort and offer them the role. There are four student facing TA roles: Help Desk—when you got stuck in the curriculum these people will get you un-stuck. Shepherd—makes sure everyone is doing alright and is where they need to be. Outcomes—people that give students mock whiteboarding/interviews, and Toy Problems—who give out a daily whiteboard question and then present a solution the next day. TAs don't design the course.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: Hackers in Residence: all, but that's part of the program design. Technical mentors: none are hired directly out of the program, but they do hire Hackers in Residence directly after they've finished teaching their first cohort. The percentage is unknown and changes. 
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: JavaScript, Node.js, AngularJS, React, ES6, Backbone and much more
  • Course syllabus: "The first half of the course involves a series of toy problems and assignments which illustrate the nuances of the technologies we teach and computer science fundamentals. In the second half of the course, students build increasingly elaborate projects of their own design, using their choice of technologies. Quite often, these projects incorporate technologies not taught in our curriculum, which students learn using fundamentals and self-teaching methods taught in the first half of the course."
  • Required student background: "A solid base of experience, ranging from extensive personal research to an undergraduate degree in computer science. In exceptional circumstances, we accept remarkable candidates who have not already undertaken significant coding projects but have passed our coding challenge and technical interview. Regardless of background, though, we expect all our students to have worked through significant amounts of programming fundamentals and to be familiarized with JavaScript before their first day of class."
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes, it is a regular practice in the first half of the course and voluntary in the second half.
  • Hours per week: 66 minimum
  • Length of program: 12 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2012. Hack Reactor Remote Beta has been offered since 2014.
  • Costs: $19,780
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 97 percent

Ironhack

Ironhack has courses on full-stack Rails development (eight weeks); front-end, WordPress-based development (ten weeks); and iOS development (eight weeks). The part-time program lasts six months. All courses are a combination of online and in-person work. International locations in Miami in the US and Madrid and Barcelona in Spain. All TAs are hired directly out of the program.

  • Courses: Web development, iOS, and front-end web development
  • In person, online, or a combination? All courses a combination
  • Locations: Miami; Madrid and Barcelona, Spain
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 94 percent
  • Median starting salary: $51,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:6
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: All day
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: Every lead instructor
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? TAs help students review and learn concepts.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 0 percent of lead instructors, 100 percent of TAs
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Include, but not limited to, Ruby, Ruby on Rails, JavaScript, jQuery, HTML, CSS, and Git. Also other tools common in development, including Slack and GitHub. Students encouraged to bring a Mac or Linux laptop.
  • Course syllabus: Syllabuses and outlines of courses available online. Example exercises include creating a command-line text adventure game, building a blog's front and back ends, building a clone of project management board Trello, building a Spotify clone, and creating a fully functioning auction website such as eBay. In final two weeks, building a final web application the student chooses.
  • Required student background: Students typically have some professional experience in their industry and want to build a new career, boost their current professional trajectory, or build their own business.
  • Student-student pair programming? Students are paired daily in randomized order for two-hour blocks of exercises based on the day's topics.
  • Hours per week: Full-time program, 60 hours per week. Part-time program, 20 hours per week, including 13 class hours and 7 remote coursework hours.
  • Length of program: Full-time program is eight weeks. Part-time program is generally six months, although the part-time front-end web development course runs ten weeks, meeting twice a week in the evenings.
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since July 2013
  • Costs: Full-time web development and iOS courses are $10,000 each, including a $1,000 deposit. Front-end web development course is $2,500. Part-time web development course tuition is $12,000, including a $1,000 deposit. Tuition and/or confirmation of financing is due one week prior to the beginning of the bootcamp.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 95.4 percent

Iron Yard

Iron Yard has an extremely wide array of technology stacks that it teaches. It also potentially has the largest number of physical school locations of any coding bootcamp. The ratio of students to teachers is larger than most bootcamps. The suggested time commitment is 60 to 80 hours a week. All programs are 12 weeks.

  • Courses: Back-end engineering, data science, UI design, front-end engineering, and mobile engineering
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person
  • Locations: Atlanta; Austin; Charleston, South Carolina; Cincinnati, Ohio; Columbia, South Carolina; Dallas; Detroit; Durham, North Carolina; Greenville, South Carolina; Houston; Indianapolis; Las Vegas; Little Rock, Arkansas; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Nashville, Tennessee; Raleigh, North Carolina; Salt Lake City, Utah; San Antonio; Washington, D.C.
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 90 percent
  • Median starting salary: No answer given.
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: Typically between 1:12 and 1:16
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: No numeric answer given, but afternoons are typically dedicated to labs and projects, with instructors available.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? Instruction is "predominantly" handled by teachers. Not all classes have TAs.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: No instructors hired directly out of the program. Some TAs hired out of the program, but no numbers given.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned? Multiple courses in JavaScript and MVC Frameworks, Python and Django, C# and .NET, Java and Clojure, Ruby on Rails, Objective-C, Swift, iOS, and user interface design
  • Course syllabus: Available online
  • Required student background: None
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes
  • Hours per week: 60 to 80 
  • Length of program: 12 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2013
  • Costs: $13,900
  • Percentage of students completing on time: Not answered

Launch Academy

Launch Academy teaches Rails, Sinatra, and React development. The in-person, full-stack course is 18 weeks (first 8 weeks are part time, 20 hours; final 10 are 60 hours). The part-time web development course is online and self-paced, running between 20 and 50 hours a week, with a variation of three to six months.

  • Courses: Full-stack development and web development
  • In person, online, or a combination? Full-stack development is in person and web development is online.
  • Location: Boston
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 92 percent, but not tied to a specific amount of time
  • Median starting salary: Not answered
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: Typically 1:7 or better
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: In a given in-person class, staff in aggregate devotes 86 hours a week for one-on-one time with all students taken together. For online, students receive one hour a week of one-on-one time. There is also access to teachers via Slack.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? 0 percent
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: Not answered, but company said it hires up to two people from a class, depending on needs.
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: JavaScript, Ruby, HTML, CSS, SQL, PostreSQL, ReactJS, Rails, Sinatra, AJAX, PostgreSQL, and Sass
  • Course syllabus: Full-stack development starts with a part-time, eight-week course to learn Ruby. For in-person part, topics covered are object-oriented programming and TDD; intro to web development; persistence with relational databases; ActiveRecord, Rails, and Rails API; JavaScript fundamentals, jQuery, Ajax, JavaScript object-oriented programming, and React; group projects; and capstone project at the end of the class.
  • Required student background: None
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes
  • Hours per week: Full-stack development's eight-week online portion is 20 hours per week, and in-person part is 60 hours per week. Web development online is self-paced.
  • Length of program: Full-stack development requires eight weeks part time online and ten weeks in person. Web development online is 20 hours per week to complete in five to six months and 50 hours per week to complete in three months.
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2013
  • Costs: In person is $15,500, including a $1,000 deposit. Balance is due seven weeks before arriving for the in-person portion. Online is $1,000 a month.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: Online rate is 91 percent, and no extensions are available.

Origin Code Academy

Origin Code Academy is a full-stack web development course based on JavaScript, Node.js and .NET (C#). Standard 12-week length with an average of 50 to 60 hours per week. It's a very young program with one location, in San Diego.

  • Courses: Full-stack web programming
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person
  • Location: San Diego
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 100 percent within 90 days
  • Median starting salary: The company provided an average, not median, starting salary of $85,000. Note that averages, unlike medians, can be influenced by outsized values at the top or bottom of the scale.
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: Capped at 1:16
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Students meet daily for 30 minutes with a mentor focused on teaching them how to code, and weekly with guest instructors on topics ranging from applying for jobs to advanced programming concepts. During the last three weeks of final projects, it's exclusively one-on-one time.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent, with an average of ten years of experience
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? Program does not use TAs.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 0 percent
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: JavaScript (AngularJs and Node.js), HTML, CSS, SQL, and C# within the .NET framework
  • Course syllabus: Available online. Students build 20 projects throughout the class and choose one as their final project.
  • Required student background: None, although students are encouraged to take online courses or a free Origin Code Academy workshop.
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes. Students alternate between working on their own, working in pairs, and working on teams of five to seven.
  • Hours per week: Average is 50 to 60 
  • Length of program: 12 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since August 2015
  • Costs: $12,000, including a $1,000 deposit, must be paid in advance of the class.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 95 percent

Sabio

Sabio has two locations in the greater Los Angeles area. It teaches ASP.NET (C#)-based web development, with AngularJS for the front-end JavaScript framework. It also does training for professional developers. The courses are a standard 12 weeks at 50 hours per week.

  • Courses: Full-stack development and front-end development
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person
  • Locations: Culver City and Newport Beach, California
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 90 percent
  • Median starting salary: $60,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:10
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: 100 percent
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent, with a minimum of 13 years of experience
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? 0 percent
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 0 percent
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, JQuery, AngularJS, ASP.NET (C#), Sql Server, and APIs
  • Course syllabus: Available online. All projects are written for tech entrepreneurs.
  • Required student background: Students must complete an eight-week preliminary program and pass a test.
  • Student-student pair programming? None, although code review is encouraged.
  • Hours per week: 50 
  • Length of program: 12 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since July 2014
  • Costs: $899 for the preliminary program, $14,450 for the bootcamp
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 90 percent

Skillcrush

Skillcrush offers all-online courses on Rails web development, WordPress development, web design, visual design, and mobile-focused web development (non-native). It offers a free 10-day introductory bootcamp. The teacher-to-student ratio is larger than most bootcamps, but prices are much lower. It has all the course materials of a bootcamp, with more of a focus on self-teaching with those materials.

  • Courses: Web designer, web developer, front-end developer, mobile web designer, freelance WordPress developer, and Ruby on Rails developer
  • In person, online, or a combination? Online
  • Location: Online
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: No answer provided
  • Median starting salary: No answer provided
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: Between 1:25 and 1:50
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Some advanced courses "include 1:1 appointments with instructors," although no information about how many. Students can also ask for help via email.
  • Percentage of teachers with  full-time programming experience: 75 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? TAs do not teach but support students via a community platform, email, and office hours.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 100 percent of TAs; only one instructor
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Ruby on Rails, Photoshop, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, Bootstrap, WordPress, PHP, Ruby, Sinatra, Rails, Git, and GitHub
  • Course syllabus: Available online
  • Required student background: None for introductory courses. Must be comfortable writing HTML and CSS for advanced courses.
  • Student-student pair programming? No
  • Hours per week: A minimum of five, but more time is probably necessary. No estimate of a typical number of hours.
  • Length of program: Three months, with lifetime access to materials
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since November 2012
  • Costs: $399, or three payments of $149
  • Percentage of students completing on time: Self-paced courses, so not applicable

The Software Guild

The Software Guild teaches Java and .NET (C#) web development, with AngularJS and jQuery for the front end. The online course is nine months, and the in-person course is 12 weeks. Schools cover the Midwest well.

  • Courses: Courses in Java or .NET/C#
  • In person, online, or a combination? Full-time in person and part-time online
  • Locations: Akron, Ohio; Louisville, Kentucky; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and online
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 95 percent within 90 days if actively searching for a job.
  • Median starting salary: In Akron and Louisville, $55,000 to $60,000; in Minneapolis, $60,000 to $65,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: Between 1:8 and 1:15. Any class with more than 12 students also has a dedicated TA.
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Teachers are in the classroom all day from 9 am to 4:30 pm, Mondays through Fridays. Any time they are not lecturing they are available for individual questions. They also meet weekly with each student, privately, for an hour.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: All instructors have at least ten years of experience as programmers.
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? Students can schedule as much time with a TA as they want. All TAs must have at least three years of experience as a professional programmer.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 0 percent
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Java, Ubuntu, Netbeans, Spring, Maven, jUnit, MySQL, Apache Tomcat, JQuery, Ajax, HTML5, Bootstrap in ASP.NET, C#, .NET framework, JavaScript, SQL Server, Git, Bitbucket, Crucible, Jira, AngularJS, jQuery, CSS, and HTML
  • Course syllabus: Available online. Final projects by teams of three students are to build a full stack blog application, including front end, back end, and database.
  • Required student background: No specific requirements
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes, every week, multiple times a week
  • Hours per week: 50 to 60 
  • Length of program: Twelve weeks in person and nine months online
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2013
  • Costs: In person is $10,000, and online is $8,500. Laptop and software are $1,500.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: Between 75 percent and 85 percent

The Tech Academy

The Tech Academy provides a mixture of lessons on WordPress development, Python, and .NET web development. The program is 15 weeks of 40-hour workweeks. One location in the US Northwest.

  • Courses: Full-stack development
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person or online
  • Locations: Portland, Oregon
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 98 percent
  • Median starting salary: $60,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:15
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Whenever the student needs it
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: About 50 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? TAs assist instructors in helping students and are overseen by instructors.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 75 percent
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned? WordPress, HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, Python, C#, SQL, ASP.NET, Visual Studio, Git, GitHub, project management
  • Course syllabus: Software Developer Boot Camp consists of 13 courses: 1. Computer Basics, 2. WordPress, 3. Overview of Software Development, 4. HTML and CSS, 5. Visual Studio, 6. Version Control, 7. SQL and Database, 8. JavaScript, 9. Python, 10. C#, 11. Project Management, 12. Live Project and 13. Job Placement 
  • Required student background: None
  • Student-student pair programming? Majority of work is individual; some pair programming on projects.
  • Hours per week: 40 
  • Length of program: 15 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2013
  • Costs: $10,000, but if paid before starting, $6,980
  • Percentage of students completing on time: Not answered

Turing School of Software & Design

Turing School of Software & Design offers a Rails web development course, with Ember.js as its front-end JS framework, and it also offers a front-end JS engineering course. The courses last up to seven months, with many students graduating early and getting jobs in the first one to three months. One location, in Denver, Colorado. You'll enjoy scenic mountain views but you won't have much time for hiking.

  • Courses: Web application development and front-end engineering
  • In person, online, or a combination? In person
  • Location: Denver
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 96 percent have full-time jobs within 120 days.
  • Median starting salary: $75,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:12
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: Students have check-ins twice a week, and a personal one-on-one with an instructor and the Community Affairs manager once per module.
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 66 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? Instructors provide more than 90 percent of instruction. TAs provide support with projects and check-ins. Experience includes good skills in programming, debugging, collaboration, and pairing.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: 3 percent
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: Ruby, Ruby on Rails, JavaScript, Node, Sinatra, Ember, CSS, HTML, jQuery
  • Course syllabus: Front-end engineering; web application development
  • Required student background: No background in programming is required. Students are selected by fit into the school culture and chance of being successful in the program and beyond.
  • Student-student pair programming? Students are assigned to pairs and teams throughout the program. Pairs and teams rotate every time so that they have exposure to different personalities and team dynamics.
  • Hours per week: 60 
  • Length of program: Seven months
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since 2014
  • Costs: Tuition is $17,500. Scholarships available to those who qualify.
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 85 percent

V School

V School offers a front-end JavaScript course that's not meant for job seekers, and a full-stack JavaScript course that is. There is also an iOS mobile development course. Technologies used include Postgres, MongoDB, AngularJS, and Express.js. It has a standard 12-week length, with an estimated 65 hours per week. Two locations in Utah.

  • Courses: Front-end JavaScript web development (not a job-seeking course) and full-stack JavaScript web development 
  • In person, online, or a combination? Either online, in person, or a combination
  • Locations: Provo and Salt Lake City, Utah; Beirut, Lebanon
  • Percentage completing program who are in full-time jobs within six months: 100 percent
  • Median starting salary: $50,000
  • Teacher-to-student ratio: 1:5
  • Time for teacher-student one-on-one: 75 percent
  • Percentage of teachers with full-time programming experience: 100 percent
  • How much TA instruction? Necessary experience to be TA? All instruction is by instructors. TAs help with individual questions. TAs need to have a strong understanding of the basic principles taught in the class and excellent troubleshooting skills.
  • Percentage of instructors/TAs hired directly out of the program: No answer
  • Languages, systems, and tools learned: HTML/CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, AngularJS, Node.js, Express.js, MongoDB, Mongoose, PostgreSQL, Postman, Chrome Developer Tools, Mac OS X, Linux Ubuntu, Mac laptops, Git, Github, Digital Ocean, Text editors, command prompt, Swift, Objective-C, and web search
  • Course syllabus: Available online
  • Required student background: Applicants take aptitude test, submit a challenge that evaluates logical thinking and problem-solving, and take a pre-course assignment.
  • Student-student pair programming? Yes
  • Hours per week: 65 
  • Length of program: 12 weeks
  • How long have you been offering bootcamps/courses? Since October 2013
  • Costs: $14,300, paid up front
  • Percentage of students completing on time: 94 percent

Have you tried any of these bootcamps before? What was your experience like? 

Would you like to add a bootcamp to this article? Simply add your suggestions to the comments section.

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