Top 20 women in #InfoSec to follow on Twitter

Twitter can seem like a never-ending sea of content. Although there are some fantastic #infosec insights daily, I’ve compiled a list of a few outstanding women who will keep you in the know for all things security. This list is a combination of hackers, strategic thinkers, and cybersecurity policy experts.

Here are 20 women in cybersecurity you should be following right now:

Window Snyder (@window)

Window is the CSO at Fastly and co-author of Threat Modeling, a practical guide to application security.

Lesley Carhart (@hacks4pancakes)

Lesley is a security incident response lead at Motorola Solutions and a self-described full-spectrum, cyber warrior princess. Check out her website.

Sandra Toms (@sandra001)

Sandra is a security and big data geek who also happens to be vice president and curator at RSA Conference...not too shabby!

Jen Ellis (@Infosecjen)

Jen is the vice president of community and public affairs at Rapid7. She works hard to get everyone to work together and advance the industry dialogue.

Shannon Leitz (@devsecops)

Shannon is a DevSecOps leader, information security and cloud security engineering, at Intuit. In 2014, Shannon received the Scott Cook Innovation Award for developing and cultivating an innovative Cloud Security Program that allows for sensitive data to be protected in AWS.

Kasha Gauthier (@kashagauthier)

Kasha is director of strategy and marketing at RSA. She is also the program committee co-chair for the National Initiative on Cyber Education (NICE).

Wendy Nather (@RCISCwendy)

Wendy is a research director at the Retail Cyber Intelligence Sharing Center. You can check out her regularly updated blog here.

Juliette Kayyem (@juliettekayyem)

Juliette is the author and host of the WGBH podcast Security Mom. Recently, she served as President Obama’s assistant secretary for intergovernmental affairs at the Department of Homeland Security.

Ann Barron-DiCamillo (@annie_bdc)

Ann is the chief technology officer at Strategic Cyber Ventures. Having 18 years of experience in information technology development and cybersecurity operations in 2015, she was named one of SC Magazine's Women in IT Security: 10 Power Players.

Emili Evripidou (@Emil_i)

Emili is the information security manager at Deloitte. She is also founder and director of the Women in Security group, a nonprofit organization aimed at raising the profile of women in the information security field.

Cecily Joseph (@cecilyjosephcr)

Cecily is the VP of corporate responsibility at Symantec. A champion for women, she received the San Francisco Commission on the Status of Women Human Rights Award for her work in advancing gender equality.

Christina Ayiotis (@christinayiotis)

Christina is an internationally recognized cyber attorney. She is currently the security and information governance leader/consultant at Cyber Sabbatical.

Runa A. Sandvik (@runasand)

Runa is director of information security at The New York Times. Check out this awesome video of Runa hacking into a “smart” sniper rifle.

Katie Moussouris (@k8em0)

Katie is the chief policy officer at HackerOne. In an effort to make the internet safer to use, Katie advises lawmakers, researchers, and customers about security.

Eleanor Dallaway (@InfosecEditor)

Eleanor is the editor of Infosecurity Magazine. She has been recognized for her awesomeness and was winner of the One to Watch award at the EWF Influential Women in Technology awards in 2013.

Bev Robb (@teksquisite)

Bev is currently serving as a security technology editor at Fortscale. She is a security blogger and Darknet researcher. You can check out her blog here.

Elinor Mills (@elinormills)

Elinor is a security/hacker enthusiast and VP of content and media strategy for Bateman Group.

Masha Sedova (@modMasha)

Masha is senior director of trust engagement at Salesforce. You can check out one of her fantastic presentations on transforming security awareness here.

Parisa Tabriz (@laparisa)

Parisa is the Chrome security engineering manager at Google and its very own “security princess.” Parisa is known for hacking into web browsers around the world so she can scope out vulnerabilities before the bad guys are able to.  

SecuriTay (@SwiftOnSecurity)

SecuriTay adds a bit of security humor to your day.


This is not an exhaustive list, so I look forward to hearing your thoughts on other great security thought leaders—who happen to be women—to follow on Twitter. 

Image credit: Flickr 

Topics: Security